INDIANAPOLIS, IND. (July 10, 2020) — Klipsch®a tech-driven premium global audio company, is pleased to introduce three new true wireless earphones that are designed to deliver best-in-class sound, comfort, technology and materials. Each new model features an innovative and functional case.

Klipsch is the official headphone and portable audio partner of the McLaren Formula 1 team. The two companies have collaborated to combine McLaren’s unparalleled design ethos and technical innovation with Klipsch’s legendary high-fidelity audio and unparalleled comfort. The result is the Klipsch T5 II True Wireless Sport McLaren edition earphones — engineered for extreme performance and designed to stay dry and in place through anything life throws at them. US MSRP $249.

Key features include

  • Dust and water-tight earphones and case (rated IP67) with moisture removal system ensure the earphones remain dry.
  • Six pairs of patented Klipsch ear tips, one pair of memory foam ear tips, and three sizes of no-budge ear wings ensure a customized, comfortable, and secure fit.
  • The case charges via USB-C or wirelessly with the included one-position wireless charging pad.
    Up to 32 hours of battery (8 hours in the earphones).
  • Best-in-class acoustic performance and four beamforming microphones with clear voice chat.
  • A seamlessly designed anodized metal signal-boost exterior antenna.
  • McLaren’s hallmark Papaya Orange and carbon fiber accents, special edition brand book, and a serialized metal card of authenticity.

New Klipsch T5 II True Wireless Sport earphones include the same features as the Klipsch McLaren edition and are available in three colors – black, white, and green. While the case charges wirelessly and via USB-C, it does not include a wireless charging pad. US MSRP $229.

Additionally, the Klipsch T5 II True Wireless earphones are the second generation of its acclaimed T5 predecessor. The earphones are approximately 25% smaller and more closely mimic the shape of the ear for maximum comfort. The amount of Klipsch patented comfort ear tips has doubled to include six pairs for a customized fit. A new signal boost antenna delivers a high-quality, seamless Bluetooth®
wireless technology connection. The earphones are dust and waterproof (rated IP67) and fit into a slimmer premium brushed metal case that holds up to a combined 32 hours of battery life (8 hours in the earphones). US MSRP $199.

The free Klipsch Connect App is available in eight languages and allows users to make product updates, EQ adjustments, access the quick start guide and troubleshoot, detect device battery status, and manage transparency controls.

All new earphone models are available for pre-order on July 10 through Klipsch.com and Worldwide Stereo. To learn more, visit Klipsch.com/mclaren-sport.

About Klipsch Audio

In 1946 Paul W. Klipsch, inventor, acoustics pioneer and maverick, founded Klipsch Audio with the sole purpose of bringing the power, detail, and emotion of the live music experience into his living room. Through the use of highly efficient speaker designs, handcrafted cabinetry, and a thirst for real engineering breakthroughs – Klipsch, the great American loudspeaker company, was born in Hope, AR. Today, our diverse range of quality audio products includes speakers and headphones for almost any consumer and professional application – including cinema, whole-house, wireless, home theater, and portable offerings. Honoring our founder’s legacy, Klipsch continues to be the legendary high-performance brand of choice for audiophiles and aficionados around the world. We are the Keepers of the Sound®.

Klipsch® and Keepers of the Sound® are registered trademarks of Klipsch Group, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Klipsch Group, Inc. is a VOXX International Company (NASDAQ: VOXX).

About McLaren Racing

McLaren Racing was founded by New Zealand racing driver Bruce McLaren in 1963. The team entered its first Formula 1 race in 1966 since when McLaren has won 20 Formula 1 world championships, more than 180 Formula 1 Grand Prix, the Le Mans 24 Hours at its first attempt, and the Indianapolis 500 three times.

McLaren Racing competes in the 2020 FIA Formula 1 World Championship with Lando Norris and Carlos Sainz, and the IndyCar Series in the US with Oliver Askew and Pato O’Ward. Fernando Alonso will compete for the team at the Indy 500 in the No. 66 Arrow McLaren SP Chevrolet.

The Leica M10-R opens up new dimensions of image quality with its high resolution of over 40 megapixels. The image sensor captures even the smallest details, so photographers can dive deeper into every scene.

The Leica M10-R with 40 Megapixel color sensor

LEICA M10-R

Redefining image quality.

Defying conventional wisdom, where increased resolution means sacrificing low-light performance, the M10-R boasts a much higher megapixel count over its 24 megapixel M10 brethren while also delivering lower levels of noise – ensuring it can be used in any and all environments for a wide range of photographic disciplines.

No other M-Camera is geared towards maximum image quality in such an uncompromising manner like the Leica M10-R.

Thus the camera fully realizes the capabilities of the prime M-Lenses and offers new stylistic and compositional approaches to the photographer.

Increased resolution
for highest detail rendition

With a resolution of over 40 megapixels, the Leica M10-R’s newly developed image sensor is able to capture even the finest textures and details.

Its base sensitivity of ISO 100, combined with fast Leica M-Lenses, makes it easy and flexible for shooting wide open and achieving maximum background blur and strong bokeh even in bright daytime light.

On the other end of the spectrum, the new sensor allows for a longer maximum exposure time of 16 minutes, lending the user more creative freedom when capturing star trails, motion blur or bringing out the tiniest amount of light in a nighttime landscape. All of this versatility at these new heights of resolution and higher dynamic range make the M10-R an imaging powerhouse for any application.

Airofit generates resistance on your respiratory muscles – primarily the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles. This causes fatigue, which is then overcompensated by muscle tissue growth, making your breathing muscles faster, stronger and more efficient – just like any other muscle group.

HOW DOES AIROFIT WORK?

See how we turn proven breathing techniques into a data-driven training solution.

THE BASICS

Of all the body’s muscle groups, the ones with the power to make a fast difference for performance are the respiratory muscles – simply because we usually don’t train them.

Together with breathing experts like Mike Maric, we have developed a range of breathing exercises that focus on different areas of your breathing to ensure you are able to unlock your full physical potential.

SEE HOW BREATHING TRAINING AFFECTS CROSSFIT PERFORMANCE

THE BREATHING TRAINER

Your Airofit breathing trainer provides adjustable airflow resistance, making your respiratory muscles work overtime. Depending on the selected training program, duration and intensity, you will be able to select the most appropriate resistance level.

Airofit’s E-unit contains pressure sensors and a Bluetooth transmitter. This allows us to measure your breathing patterns and visualize them on your phone via the Airofit Sport mobile app.

THE MOBILE APP

Airofit has combined respiratory training with the latest technology by connecting the trainer to your smartphone.

Since all training is designed to be done separately form physical activity, your phone guides you through all exercises.

The app acts as a virtual breathing coach, giving you live feedback and ensuring all exercises are performed correctly since you see the level of your compliance. The access to your training data gives an overview of your progress over time.

Fremont, CA, USA – Thursday, 16 July 2020 – Blackmagic Design today announced Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K, a new digital film camera with an advanced 12,288 x 6,480 12K Super 35 image sensor, 14 stops of dynamic range and high frame rate shooting at up to 60 frames per second in 12K at 80 megapixels per frame. This new 3rd generation model supports new Blackmagic Generation 5 Color Science and higher Blackmagic RAW performance, all in the award winning URSA Mini Pro camera body.

Blackmagic Design Announces Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K

Fremont, CA, USA – Thursday, 16 July 2020 – Blackmagic Design today announced Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K, a new digital film camera with an advanced 12,288 x 6,480 12K Super 35 image sensor, 14 stops of dynamic range and high frame rate shooting at up to 60 frames per second in 12K at 80 megapixels per frame. This new 3rd generation model supports new Blackmagic Generation 5 Color Science and higher Blackmagic RAW performance, all in the award winning URSA Mini Pro camera body.

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K will be available in July 2020 from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide for US$9,995.

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K is a revolution in digital film with a 12,288 x 6480 12K Super 35 sensor and 14 stops of dynamic range, built into the award winning URSA Mini body. The combination of 80 megapixels per frame, new color science and the flexibility of Blackmagic RAW makes working with 12K a reality. Oversampling from 12K gives customers the best 8K and 4K images with the subtle skin tones and extraordinary detail of high end still cameras. Customers can shoot at 60 fps in 12K, 110 fps in 8K and up to 220 fps in 4K Super 16. URSA Mini Pro 12K features an interchangeable PL mount, as well as built in ND filters, dual CFast and UHS-II SD card recorders, a SuperSpeed USB-C expansion port and more.

URSA Mini Pro 12K’s extreme resolution goes well beyond traditional motion picture film. Customers get the benefits of shooting with film including incredible detail, wide dynamic range and rich, deep color. Perfect for feature films, episodic television and immersive, large format IMAX. The incredible definition around objects makes it ideal for working with green screen and VFX including compositing live action and CGI. Super sampling at 12K means customers not only get better color and resolution at 8K, but also a smoothness that comes from making aliasing invisible.

The Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K features a revolutionary new sensor with a native resolution of 12,288 x 6480, which is an incredible 80 megapixels per frame. The Super 35 sensor has a superb 14 stops of dynamic range and a native ISO of 800. The new 12K sensor has equal amounts of red, green and blue pixels and is optimized for images at multiple resolutions. Customers can shoot 12K at 60 fps or use in-sensor scaling to allow 8K or 4K RAW at up to 110 fps without cropping or changing their field of view. URSA Mini Pro’s interchangeable lens mount lets customers choose from the widest range of vintage and modern cinema lenses, so customers can capture every ounce of character and detail from their favorite optics.

The URSA Mini Pro 12K sensor and Blackmagic RAW were designed together to make 12 bit RAW workflows in 12K effortless. As an incredibly efficient next generation codec Blackmagic RAW lets customers shoot 12K and edit on a laptop, a capability that simply isn’t possible with other codecs. The massive resolution of the sensor means you can reframe shots in post for delivery in 8K and 4K. It’s like a multi camera shoot with only one camera. And it’s perfect for great looking vertical and square video, too. The advanced design of the sensor and Blackmagic RAW means that customers can work in any resolution in post production instantly, without rendering, while retaining the full sensor’s color accuracy.

Only Blackmagic RAW makes cinema quality 12-bit, 80 megapixel images at up to 60 frames a reality. Constant quality Q0 and Q5 options and new Q1 and Q3 lock the quality level, allowing compression to adapt, matching the detail of the scene. Constant bitrate encoding options 5:1, 8:1, 12:1 and the new 18:1 are designed to give customers the best possible images with predictable and consistent file size. Customers can record RAW to two cards simultaneously so customers can shoot 12K or 8K to either CFast or UHS-II cards, even at high frame rates. Blackmagic RAW stores camera metadata, lens data, white balance, digital slate information and custom LUTs to ensure consistency of image on set and through post production.

Shooting RAW in 12K preserves the deepest control of detail, exposure and color during post. Oversampling means customers get extremely sharp 8K without harsh edges. Best of all, Blackmagic RAW is designed to accelerate 12K for post production, making it as easy to work with as standard HD or Ultra HD files. It is highly optimized, multi‑threaded, works across multiple CPU cores and is also GPU accelerated to work with Apple Metal, CUDA and OpenCL. So customers can always work with their camera RAW files without having to make proxies. Blackmagic RAW 12K images provide unprecedented resolution and quality for color, keying, compositing, reframing, stabilization and tracking in 4K or 8K.

Blackmagic Generation 5 Color Science features a new film curve designed to make full use of the massive amount of color data from the new URSA Mini Pro 12K sensor. This delivers even better color response for more pleasing skin tones, and better rendering of highly saturated colors such as neon signs and car tail lights in high contrast scenes. Generation 5 Color Science informs complex Blackmagic RAW image processing, with color and dynamic range data from the sensor preserved via metadata for use in post production. Compatible with all previously shot Blackmagic RAW files, Generation 5 Color Science lets customers take advantage of the new film curve even with their existing work.

URSA Mini Pro 12K is multiple cameras in one, shooting standard resolutions and frame rates in 4K, 8K and even insanely detailed 12K. With a massive 80 megapixels per frame at 60 fps in RAW customers can capture perfect stills and motion shots in a single camera at the same time. Customers can shoot up to 60 fps in 12K 12,288 x 6480 17:9. For higher frame rates, customers can shoot 110 fps at 8192 x 4320, 140 fps at 8192 x 3408 and even window the sensor to Super 16 to capture 4K at an incredible 220 fps at 4096 x 2160 DCI. URSA Mini Pro 12K has flexible frame rate and resolution options, and captures with improved motion rendering which means that customers get smoother edges in 8K and 4K even at lower frame rates.

URSA Mini Pro 12K is the ultimate high bandwidth recorder with 3 options for recording 12K, which contains almost 10 times the resolution of Ultra HD. Customers get dual built in CFast and UHS-II SD card recorders, and a SuperSpeed USB-C expansion port for recording to fast SATA and NVMe drives. With “Record RAW on 2 Cards” turned on, URSA Mini Pro 12K can record simultaneously across two cards up to an incredible 900MB/s to 2 CFast cards, or an impressive 500MB/s to 2 UHS-II SD cards. The SuperSpeed USB-C expansion port on the rear can record to USB-C flash storage up to 900MB/s as a third recording option so customers won’t be short of choices for capturing stunning 12K up to 60p or 8K up to 110p.

Different projects require different lenses which is why URSA Mini Pro features an interchangeable lens mount. Customers can quickly switch between PL, EF and F mount lenses on the URSA Mini Pro 12K, as well as B4 lenses on the URSA Mini Pro 4.6K G2. That means customers can work with high quality large PL cinema lenses, EF or F mount photographic lenses, and even B4 broadcast lenses, making URSA Mini Pro compatible with the widest possible range of professional lenses.

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro features an innovative high speed USB-C Expansion Port. The 4.6K G2 model features USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 which operates at up to 5 Gb/s, while the new 12K model has a USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 for a blistering 10 Gb/s. Customers can connect and power external flash disks and SSDs or on URSA Mini Pro 12K customers can connect the new URSA Mini Recorder for recording to fast NVMe SSD drives for longer recording times. NVMe SSD drives are ideal for shooting 12K in the highest constant quality 12‑bit Blackmagic RAW in the Q0 setting or for high frame rates. When shooting is complete customers can simply move the external disk to their computer and start editing from the same disk, eliminating file copying.

URSA Mini Pro includes a full version of DaVinci Resolve Studio. Customers get the world’s most advanced solution that combines professional editing, color correction, audio post and visual effects all in one software tool. DaVinci Resolve is used to finish more Hollywood feature films than any other solution, so users will get the best possible post production tools to edit native video from their camera and retain every bit of quality. Whether users are working on major Hollywood feature films, episodic television, music videos, commercials or even the latest YouTube shoot, DaVinci Resolve Studio gives customers a completely lossless workflow for native editing, color correction, effects, audio and delivery.

The new Blackmagic URSA Mini Recorder lets customers record 12-bit Blackmagic RAW files onto fast 2.5 inch SSDs, including the latest U.2 NVMe Enterprise SSDs. SSDs such as the latest 7mm U.2 NVMe disks are super fast, delivering data transfer speeds of up to 900 MB/s. This blazing fast performance allows customers longer recording times for full resolution 4K, 8K and 12K 12-bit Blackmagic RAW files in the highest quality Q0 encoding. The unique design of the Blackmagic URSA Mini Recorder means it attaches directly to the back of their URSA Mini Pro between the camera and the battery. It’s controlled via the USB-C so customers don’t have to worry about manually starting or stopping the SSD recorder.

“With Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K we have advanced imaging technology into a new generation where new styles of shooting will be possible”, said Grant Petty, CEO, Blackmagic Design. “Its not just the 12K sensor, but there is so many other innovations in this camera. From the Generation 5 Color Science, the in sensor scaling, new symmetrical color pattern, full RGB quality and of course the 12K resolution, it’s going to be exciting to see what DOPs do creatively with this technology!”

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K Features

  • 12,288 x 6480 12K Super 35 sensor.
  • Use for feature films, VFX and high end TVC’s.
  • 14 stops of dynamic range and native 800 ISO.
  • New Blackmagic RAW for real time 12K editing.
  • Blackmagic RAW optimized for Metal, CUDA and OpenCL.
  • Generation 5 Color Science with new film curve.
  • Shoot up to 60 fps in 12K, 110 fps at 8K and 220 fps at 4K.
  • Dual card CFast recording at up to 900MB/s.
  • PL mount included, EF and F mounts available.
  • SuperSpeed USB-C for recording to external disks.
  • Includes DaVinci Resolve Studio for post production.
  • Compatible with new Blackmagic URSA Mini Recorder.

Availability and Price

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K will be available in July 2020 for US$9,995, excluding duties, from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide.

Press Photography

Product photos of the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12K, as well as all other Blackmagic Design products, are available at www.blackmagicdesign.com/media/images.

About Blackmagic Design

Blackmagic Design creates the world’s highest quality video editing products, digital film cameras, color correctors, video converters, video monitoring, routers, live production switchers, disk recorders, waveform monitors and real time film scanners for the feature film, post production and television broadcast industries. Blackmagic Design’s DeckLink capture cards launched a revolution in quality and affordability in post production, while the company’s Emmy™ award winning DaVinci color correction products have dominated the television and film industry since 1984. Blackmagic Design continues ground breaking innovations including 6G-SDI and 12G-SDI products and stereoscopic 3D and Ultra HD workflows. Founded by world leading post production editors and engineers, Blackmagic Design has offices in the USA, UK, Japan, Singapore and Australia. For more information, please go to www.blackmagicdesign.com.

Beta Technologies revealed its new eVTOL prototype on Friday during a 30-mile (50-kilometer) airlift from its headquarters in Burlington, Vermont, to the flight test facility in Plattsburgh, New York. There, the new aircraft will continue the ground testing already begun in Vermont, with on-the-wing and hover tests and finally transitions between the two — all expected within the next few months.

Beta Technologies revealed its new eVTOL prototype on Friday during a 30-mile 

Beta’s much-anticipated Alia eVTOL made its public debut on June 12 during its move to a flight test facility in New York. Eric Adams Photo

The fixed-rotor Alia, as the aircraft is presently code-named, succeeds the tilt-rotor Ava prototype, which was revealed in January 2019 and which the company used to validate propulsion and flight-control systems as well as better understand the aerodynamics of eVTOL in small aircraft. (Though Alia is relatively large compared to its eVTOL competitors.) The new 6,000-pound (2,720-kilogram) airplane is completely fly-by-wire and uses a 50-foot (15-meter) arched wing for lift in horizontal flight; four fixed rotors, mounted high at wing-level, for vertical flight; and a rear pusher prop to speed it along more efficiently in while moving forward. In that phase, the four rotors would be locked in their lowest drag position.

According to founder Kyle Clark, Alia already has months of tethered hover tests under its belt, along with a few high-speed taxi tests using a wheeled landing gear assembly — affectionately known as “the shopping cart” — in place of the airplane’s normal skids. “We completed high-speed taxi tests the other day, and that was a huge boost,” Clark said. “We were able to ensure that we have pitch stability in the airplane and can lift the nose wheels off the ground and put them back down. We’re penetrating the aerodynamics just in time for the move to Plattsburgh, where we can continue in earnest.”

The airplane was built at Beta’s hangar on the grounds of Burlington International Airport, but the steady cadence of commercial flights there, as well as Vermont’s Air National Guard unit flying Lockheed Martin F-35s twice a day, means that conducting a proper flight test program with several flights each day would be virtually impossible amid the ever-present risk of a new aircraft type needing occasional tows to and from the runway. Beta’s plan has all along been to transfer Alia to Plattsburgh, just as it did with Ava. That airport, a former U.S. Air Force base, has ramps and runways built to accommodate Boeing B-52 bombers, and thus plenty of room. It only has limited daily service and no control tower.

Throughout the flight test program, Beta will effectively serve as a private air taxi service, with company pilots shuttling personnel back and forth across the lake several times each day. Its 15-aircraft flight department includes five pilots total — most ex-military — with several additional team members in training. Clark and Nick Warren, a former U.S. Marine Corps pilot who flew Marine One for President Barack Obama, will be the initial test pilots for Alia.

Following Friday’s airlift (via a Sikorsky S-61 helicopter operated by Helicarrier), the flight test program will continue at Plattsburgh with more tethered hover test and high-speed taxi tests, then progress to horizontal flight while still on the wheeled landing gear, to fully understand the aircraft’s behavior as a conventional airplane, Clark said. Only then will it proceed to vertical flight, via untethered hovers initially then controlled ascents and descents, before folding in the transition from horizontal to vertical and back.

Alia being flown across Lake Champlain to its flight test facility in Plattsburgh, New York. Eric Adams Photo

The team hopes it will validate the work to make a clean, simple design. This was initially inspired by the Arctic tern, a bird with the longest migration on earth, with annual distances averaging around 45,000 miles (72,000 km). Its hyper-efficient aerodynamics are reflected in Alia’s arcing wings and tapering surfaces. Aerodynamicist Mark Page, of DZYNE Technologies, then helped hone Alia’s configuration and overall aerodynamics to meet the efficiency challenges of combined vertical and horizontal flight capability — absent the furious wing-flapping a tern can use to spring into flight.

“We selected a wing that would allow us to go slow enough to enable a compromise design between dedicated hover props and dedicated cruise props,” Page said. “If you want an airplane to both pick itself up in the air and push itself forward, you need to either change the pitch of the prop drastically, or it has to have that compromise between the two.”

Using variable-pitch propellers felt as off-limits as tilting props, as both required significant, heavy hardware, especially if there were eight, 10, or more propellers on the aircraft. Tilting wing systems proved even more problematic, introducing unappealing, asymmetrical stall characteristics as well awkward transitions to backward flight in hovers. The final product had to answer to all these challenges. “Because it’s VTOL, it’s no-joke loads — not just some secondary aerodynamic load,” Page said. “You’re picking up the whole damn airplane and contorting it around in gusty winds.”

To zero in on a viable design, Page focused on mitigating drag, increasing the tail size, and using a bigger wing, all of which improved stability and efficiency at low speeds. The engineers also created more robust propeller designs and torquier motors to enable immediate, precision control of the aircraft as it progressed through multiple phases of flight, as well as the ability to hover on low power, reducing the draw on the battery. The final design is extremely “economic,” Page said, with the least amount of moving parts while still enabling the transition, and the computer-controlled quad-rotor configuration allows for easy movement in all directions while in the hover mode.

Making Alia efficient in forward flight meant counteracting as much as possible all the tactics they deployed to optimize vertical flight, including the two outriggers on which the four rotors are mounted. They are aerodynamic in both directions, in that they don’t introduce their own turbulence or vortices, and they’re also designed to not amplify the acoustics, which protrusions that large that tend to do.

Another key challenge has been developing a control system that feels balanced, natural, and predictable for pilots in all modes of flight, with none feeling unstable and the controls never mushy or uncertain. Persistent control authority is key, as is harmony between all the control surfaces activated in each mode and during the transition. “The goal is a wide transition envelope, so that it transitions smoothly at a variety of speeds, altitudes, air densities, wind gusts, and controller forces,” Page said. “It has to accommodate imperfect conditions and imperfect piloting. Control harmony allows you to have that without becoming unstable. It makes it much more enjoyable for the pilot to fly, and much safer.”

Further tuning of the airflow helped achieve what Page thinks will prove to be a smooth, laminar aircraft with low drag and minimal aerodynamic interference from various interfaces on the airplane — such as landing gear, the tail assembly, and the intersection of the wing and the fuselage. The latter is a particularly problematic area, as it tends to cancel out efficiencies achieved elsewhere. To manage it, Page made the wing and body connection extremely blended. Not so much that it could be called a blended-wing-body airplane, but enough to diminish the losses.

All of this was validated through computer simulation, in particular via the X-Plane software developed by Laminar Research — a program that’s renowned for its highly accurate physics simulations. Creator Austin Meyer serves as an advisor to Beta, and contributed to its control system designs. Test pilot Camron “Arlo” Guthrie, who flew General Dynamics F-16s for the Air National Guard, has been leading the integration of this simulation technology to ensure it’s smoothly deployed for training as well as aerodynamic modeling and flight-control development.

“We have a totally new propulsion system and aircraft configuration, and these need unique avionics, displays, control interfaces, and more,” Guthrie said while demonstrating Alia’s flight simulator. “We’re now in our 10th iteration of our flight controls, and we’re constantly testing it all out here to see how it works. It’s a truly immersive, visual environment to work in.”

Guthrie said the advance to aggressive flight test will allow them to hone the algorithms and aircraft responses to pilot inputs — as well as help them make sure pilots can intuitively grasp what the airplane is doing. So far, flying the simulator has suggested that Alia should be an easy bird to fly. “It’s a light touch, just as you’d expect in a very high-performance airplane,” Guthrie said. “But it’s also a very low-workload airplane and has excellent handling qualities. To land you just get down to the stall speed of conventional airplanes, and then lean into it and you’re in horizontal flight.”

Alia’s flight test program will continue with more more tethered hovers and high-speed taxi tests before progressing to horizontal and then vertical flight. Eric Adams Photo

Beta’s first application for Alia will be to accommodate the mission of United Therapeutics, the pharmaceutical company that provided initial funding for Beta. United Therapeutics is developing manmade organs for human transplant, and founder Martine Rothblatt — herself an accomplished aviator who also sponsored the development of an electric version of the Robinson R44 helicopter by Tier One Engineering — wanted a reliable, green system for distributing those organs on-demand. Clark said the urgency of that mission compelled the Beta team to select a configuration that would generate the greatest range and be the most safe and reliable feasible system — that is, with the fewest amount of breakable moving parts, and also the most redundancy.

The motors Beta developed are essentially two motors in one for each rotor, so the likelihood of failure is dramatically reduced, and the minimization of moving parts will help speed certification — a challenge faced by all eVTOL manufacturers. It has also made the development process filled with far fewer unknowns. “We’re not trying to break the laws of physics,” said mechanical engineer Manon Belzile. “You might not be able to find the most lightweight solution right away, but we can certainly find solutions that will make this aircraft fly. Then the more we fly, the more we’ll be able to optimize everything. It’s an engineering challenge, but we know we’re going to get there.”

Fast on the heels of the United Therapeutics adoption, Alia will be adapted for commercial and industrial use, a role as an air taxi, and military applications. Beta is already proving integral to the U.S. Air Force’s Agility Prime effort to spur the development of electric aircraft. Along with Joby Aviation, it’s one of just two companies to recently advance to the next stage of development support from the Air Force in that effort.

Beta hasn’t estimated Alia’s range and other specifications formally yet, though it will say it’s targeting 250 miles (400 kilometers) and charge times under one hour. Its battery technology is still not fully disclosed, though its packs are designed and manufactured in-house from commercially available lithium-ion cells. Propulsion engineer Herman Wiegman, a former energy storage specialist for GE Global Research, said the program is viable with existing battery technology, albeit with careful integration.

“The battery pack is fundamental, and very integral to the success of the aircraft,” he noted. “But you have to be careful about the presence of the mass in the aircraft, how much frontal area is dedicated to the battery packs, how much drag will be induced because of their presence. One doesn’t simply purchase a battery pack off the common market and integrate it into an aircraft.” He added, however, that their mass can be advantageous, helping stabilize the aircraft against wind gusts while in a hover, for instance.

2020 will be great for Samsung innovations. A year that will see the company chart a bold new future not only for technologies like AI, 5G and IoT, but for everyday devices like gaming monitors as well.

Odyssey G7 and G9, the monitors of the future for games

Since producing its first gaming screen less than four years ago, Samsung has risen to the top of the market with a portfolio of offerings that combine outstanding performance with immersive images.

Now, the company has announced that starting this year, its Odyssey line of gaming laptops, PCs, and virtual reality devices will expand to include gaming monitors as well. This will establish Odyssey as Samsung’s official product line of gaming equipment.

Starting Left: Ki-hong Kim, Adam Burgess and Juwon Cho of Samsung Electronics ’Product Design Group, Visual Display Business

Visitors to the Samsung booth at CES 2020 can see first-hand how the company applied the futuristic design patterns (gamers love) the line is known for, to create the new Odyssey G7 and G9.

Both the G7 (27- or 32-inch) and G9 (49-inch) come with top-tier specs that include ultra-wide displays with 1000R curvature, fast 1ms response time, 240Hz refresh rate for a Incredibly smooth FPS (first-person shooter) gameplay, G-Sync support, and more.

To learn more about the design behind the gaming monitors, Samsung Newsroom interviewed some of the designers who brought these monitors to life.

A new chapter for the odyssey

In discussing the refinement process for the Odyssey G7 and G9 designs, each member of Samsung’s Visual Display Business team emphasized the importance of prioritizing the needs and interests of gamers. At its core, that’s what the Odyssey line is all about: equipping users with the tools they need to enjoy the best possible gaming experience.

However, as Visual Communication designer Adam Burgess noted, the launch of the Odyssey G7 and G9 not only demonstrates Samsung’s commitment to bringing revolutionary technologies to gaming consumers, it also provides an opportunity to effectively communicate the philosophy of the line. Odyssey, in a way that feels authentic to our product offerings now and in the future.

That philosophy comes true in a pair of monitors created under design principles that can be summed up with the words brave, futuristic and confident. The device’s simple designs set the tone for Odyssey monitors to follow, and are distinguished by their strong contrast of black and white elements and the use of attractive blue accents. (It should be noted that the name Odyssey will also apply to Samsung gaming monitors that are already on the market.)

The word ‘Odyssey’ (odyssey) reminds us of the idea of ​​navigation, of travel, Burgess said.

As Samsung’s official product line for gaming equipment, Odyssey offers consumers superior gaming experiences powered by a combination of advanced gaming technologies and useful design. Together, these two attributes evoke the image of moving into the future, he added.

Future focused

Odyssey G7 and G9’s futuristic designs are products of the team’s careful observation of market trends. Odyssey G9 designer Juwon Cho explained the team’s approach:

Our market research has shown that Samsung gaming monitors consistently get good reviews. However, we get feedback that some consumers would like to see genre-specific game elements incorporated into game monitor designs. To chart the best path to improve our offerings, we first examine some of the popular games and devices that gamers tend to prefer. When research showed that many players prefer futuristic concepts, the team adopted that term as a key design principle.

For gamers, one of the Odyssey G9’s most attractive and futuristic design elements may be the Infinity Core Lighting on its back. As Cho explained, the key to its design boils down to the same factor that allows the monitor to transform users’ gaming sessions: immersion.

When designing lighting, we use light and mirrors to create the feeling that when you look at it you are being transported to another dimension, Cho said. Of course, playing on a curved 49-inch monitor with a 32: 9 aspect ratio evokes the same feeling of immersion, and that alone would already be very appealing to many gamers. However, we wanted to create game monitors that offered more. That is, we wanted them to be monitors that users took pride in displaying.

However, as design team member Ki-hong Kim explained, immersion was not the only factor that guided the Odyssey G7’s lighting design. Like all Samsung gaming monitors, the Odyssey G7 has what we like to call Arena Lighting on its back, Kim said.

We differentiate the design by adding dynamic shapes and lighting to the front frame of the monitor. It’s all part of creating a monitor that, like the futuristic armor and weapons in science fiction games, projects a solid image as a gaming gear.

Convenience is key

Kim emphasized that the consumer is always key when it comes to product design, and because gamers are always interested in what professionals are wearing, we ask professional gamers to share their detailed opinions and preferences so that they can be incorporated into the product. .

For example, the support of a gaming monitor is considered by many professional gamers to be a very important design consideration. This is because they often require a large space to move the mouse when playing games and a wide monitor stand can get in their way.

It is also important that the monitor stand does not prevent them from placing their keyboard in a comfortable position. To address these drawbacks, the team carefully calibrated the angle of the Odyssey G7’s stand to allow users to comfortably position their keyboard and move their mouse freely. Users can also easily rotate, tilt, and adjust the height of the Odyssey G7 and G9 to accommodate their posture and eye level.

Break with the conventional

Continuing her detailed explanation of the Odyssey G7’s design, Kim described several ways the team improved the gaming monitor to differentiate it from conventional offerings. The G7’s 1000R curved display is a notable departure from typical gaming monitors, which feature square rectangular frames. She also explained how the team optimized accent lighting to enhance the gaming experience and make the monitor stand out.

Some of our team were concerned that adding lighting to the front of the screen could disturb the game, Kim said. This led us to create a lighting design that directs light downward. The design received positive reviews from users, and with that aspect of the design fixed, we were able to continue developing the product.

The bright white design of the Odyssey G9 is another thing that sets it apart from the conventional. After surveying customer reviews, the team chose to use this color because comments indicated that white creates the strongest impression of futuristic design. The feedback on the monitors themselves has been great so far as they both won the Innovation Awards at this year’s CES – the Odyssey G9 in the category of computer peripherals and the G7 in the gaming category.

Make the most of the monitor

In addition to discussing the process of refining the Odyssey G7 and G9 designs, the designers revealed how they would use the monitors to enhance their own gaming experiences.

A lot of times when I play, I do it in a dark environment so I can immerse myself in the game and focus better, Kim said. The lighting at the front and rear of the G7 was designed with these environments in mind, and helps make the gaming experience much more immersive.

Cho added that the Odyssey G9’s immersive amp design has the power to transform the way users experience their favorite games. The G9’s 1000R curvature allows the user to fill the entire field of view, Cho said.

When you experience games that support the monitor’s 32: 9 screen ratio, especially with FPS, flight simulator, and racing competitions, the level of immersion is such that you feel like you’re in-game, he added.

The gaming monitor market is estimated to grow from approximately 7.8 million units in 2019 to 12.2 million in 2023.1 Going forward, Samsung will continue to lead innovation in the market by offering gamers monitor designs that prioritize their needs.

Even after the launch of a gaming monitor, the team will constantly search for feedback and data to reflect on future product designs, Cho said.

Our goal, Kim concluded, is to anticipate trends in the rapidly evolving gaming market and to design products that lead those trends, rather than products that are simply different from what already exists.