Industry 4.0 or Fourth Industrial Revolution refers to the process of digitization and automation of remote controlled jobs in the industrial sector. In this technological revolution, robotics and connectivity are the backbone of the manufacturing processes. The so-called Intelligent Industry, improves productivity, manufacturing costs, the quality of business and companies.

What is Industry 4.0, the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Industry 4.0 and the fourth Industrial revolution
Contents Index
What is connected industry and characteristics of 4.0 technologies
Industry 4.0 refers to the introduction in the production of advanced and intelligent technologies through the use of Internet applications as an essential tool. The digital integration of information is carried out using as pillars the technological advances that have occurred in robotics, Artificial Intelligence, data analytics (Big Data) and the Internet of Things (Internet of Things).

This flow of information between applications within the connected industry is called PDP, which is the acronym for “Physical to Digital to Physical”.

From physical to Digital. Physical information is taken and transformed into digital data.
From Digital to Digital. The data is collected and analyzed through analytics (Big Data) and processed by Artificial Intelligence algorithms.
From Digital to Physical. The result is transmitted to the physical world to communicate a decision or order.
The industry connected to Artificial Intelligence is characterized by offering immediate results with a degree of analysis and study infinitely greater than the traditional one. The technologies of Industry 4.0 are influenced, as well as complemented by others, such as Artificial Vision, Virtual and Augmented Reality, Cloud Computing or the intelligent virtual assistants themselves.

What is connected industry 4.0 and the technologies of industry 4.0
Connectivity in the Fourth Industrial Revolution


The optimization of processes is a large-scale challenge for the ecosystem of companies and organizations. The industrial sectors of the countries that do not manage to adapt to Industrial automation will see their survival chances and their potential diminished, since they compete in the market at a clear disadvantage and with lower profitability of a product.

To achieve this, associated technologies are used, such as 5G networks that allow fast data transmission between devices. A complete revolution is taking place in warehouse logistics, with the implementation of robots or autonomous AGV and AIV vehicles.

Cybersecurity in Industry 4.0
Preserving the security of the information that is most sensitive to production processes and especially customer data, is one of the great challenges we will face in the coming decades. Today, obtaining the most sensitive data of your clients is more lucrative than robbing a bank. The same happens with obtaining confidential information from the production processes and data analysis of your competitors.

An example is the dozens of cyber threats that a Vitoria robotics company called Alias ​​Robotics has detected in Universal Robots robots. Can you imagine hackers paralyzing a robotic car production line? What if bots start offering their customers toxic financial products? Well, to tell the truth, banks have never required the intervention of hackers to offer these services …

Industry 4.0 examples
Impact of Industrial 4.0 transformation
The Era of technological transformation of companies is allowing more versatile responses to a product or client, as well as an increase in business results. Studies show that smart factories that have integrated IT systems increase their production capacity by 20%. Intelligent organizations develop forms of production being more flexible, fast, efficient and with greater analysis capacity.

Of course, the digitization of industrial production processes also affects employees, improving the health and safety of the workers themselves. Nevertheless, they are not the only ones. Organizations now manage their productivity methods through software, which allows them to be more predictive and make decisions in real time.

Impact of Industrial 4.0 transformation
We see that in the Era of Connected Industry, the personalization of products to customers allows them to individualize their needs, increasing the degree of satisfaction in the consumption of a product and with the company itself. It is due to How Big Data works and the implementation of the Internet of Things to Industry 4.0

Beta Technologies revealed its new eVTOL prototype on Friday during a 30-mile (50-kilometer) airlift from its headquarters in Burlington, Vermont, to the flight test facility in Plattsburgh, New York. There, the new aircraft will continue the ground testing already begun in Vermont, with on-the-wing and hover tests and finally transitions between the two — all expected within the next few months.

Beta Technologies revealed its new eVTOL prototype on Friday during a 30-mile 

Beta’s much-anticipated Alia eVTOL made its public debut on June 12 during its move to a flight test facility in New York. Eric Adams Photo

The fixed-rotor Alia, as the aircraft is presently code-named, succeeds the tilt-rotor Ava prototype, which was revealed in January 2019 and which the company used to validate propulsion and flight-control systems as well as better understand the aerodynamics of eVTOL in small aircraft. (Though Alia is relatively large compared to its eVTOL competitors.) The new 6,000-pound (2,720-kilogram) airplane is completely fly-by-wire and uses a 50-foot (15-meter) arched wing for lift in horizontal flight; four fixed rotors, mounted high at wing-level, for vertical flight; and a rear pusher prop to speed it along more efficiently in while moving forward. In that phase, the four rotors would be locked in their lowest drag position.

According to founder Kyle Clark, Alia already has months of tethered hover tests under its belt, along with a few high-speed taxi tests using a wheeled landing gear assembly — affectionately known as “the shopping cart” — in place of the airplane’s normal skids. “We completed high-speed taxi tests the other day, and that was a huge boost,” Clark said. “We were able to ensure that we have pitch stability in the airplane and can lift the nose wheels off the ground and put them back down. We’re penetrating the aerodynamics just in time for the move to Plattsburgh, where we can continue in earnest.”

The airplane was built at Beta’s hangar on the grounds of Burlington International Airport, but the steady cadence of commercial flights there, as well as Vermont’s Air National Guard unit flying Lockheed Martin F-35s twice a day, means that conducting a proper flight test program with several flights each day would be virtually impossible amid the ever-present risk of a new aircraft type needing occasional tows to and from the runway. Beta’s plan has all along been to transfer Alia to Plattsburgh, just as it did with Ava. That airport, a former U.S. Air Force base, has ramps and runways built to accommodate Boeing B-52 bombers, and thus plenty of room. It only has limited daily service and no control tower.

Throughout the flight test program, Beta will effectively serve as a private air taxi service, with company pilots shuttling personnel back and forth across the lake several times each day. Its 15-aircraft flight department includes five pilots total — most ex-military — with several additional team members in training. Clark and Nick Warren, a former U.S. Marine Corps pilot who flew Marine One for President Barack Obama, will be the initial test pilots for Alia.

Following Friday’s airlift (via a Sikorsky S-61 helicopter operated by Helicarrier), the flight test program will continue at Plattsburgh with more tethered hover test and high-speed taxi tests, then progress to horizontal flight while still on the wheeled landing gear, to fully understand the aircraft’s behavior as a conventional airplane, Clark said. Only then will it proceed to vertical flight, via untethered hovers initially then controlled ascents and descents, before folding in the transition from horizontal to vertical and back.

Alia being flown across Lake Champlain to its flight test facility in Plattsburgh, New York. Eric Adams Photo

The team hopes it will validate the work to make a clean, simple design. This was initially inspired by the Arctic tern, a bird with the longest migration on earth, with annual distances averaging around 45,000 miles (72,000 km). Its hyper-efficient aerodynamics are reflected in Alia’s arcing wings and tapering surfaces. Aerodynamicist Mark Page, of DZYNE Technologies, then helped hone Alia’s configuration and overall aerodynamics to meet the efficiency challenges of combined vertical and horizontal flight capability — absent the furious wing-flapping a tern can use to spring into flight.

“We selected a wing that would allow us to go slow enough to enable a compromise design between dedicated hover props and dedicated cruise props,” Page said. “If you want an airplane to both pick itself up in the air and push itself forward, you need to either change the pitch of the prop drastically, or it has to have that compromise between the two.”

Using variable-pitch propellers felt as off-limits as tilting props, as both required significant, heavy hardware, especially if there were eight, 10, or more propellers on the aircraft. Tilting wing systems proved even more problematic, introducing unappealing, asymmetrical stall characteristics as well awkward transitions to backward flight in hovers. The final product had to answer to all these challenges. “Because it’s VTOL, it’s no-joke loads — not just some secondary aerodynamic load,” Page said. “You’re picking up the whole damn airplane and contorting it around in gusty winds.”

To zero in on a viable design, Page focused on mitigating drag, increasing the tail size, and using a bigger wing, all of which improved stability and efficiency at low speeds. The engineers also created more robust propeller designs and torquier motors to enable immediate, precision control of the aircraft as it progressed through multiple phases of flight, as well as the ability to hover on low power, reducing the draw on the battery. The final design is extremely “economic,” Page said, with the least amount of moving parts while still enabling the transition, and the computer-controlled quad-rotor configuration allows for easy movement in all directions while in the hover mode.

Making Alia efficient in forward flight meant counteracting as much as possible all the tactics they deployed to optimize vertical flight, including the two outriggers on which the four rotors are mounted. They are aerodynamic in both directions, in that they don’t introduce their own turbulence or vortices, and they’re also designed to not amplify the acoustics, which protrusions that large that tend to do.

Another key challenge has been developing a control system that feels balanced, natural, and predictable for pilots in all modes of flight, with none feeling unstable and the controls never mushy or uncertain. Persistent control authority is key, as is harmony between all the control surfaces activated in each mode and during the transition. “The goal is a wide transition envelope, so that it transitions smoothly at a variety of speeds, altitudes, air densities, wind gusts, and controller forces,” Page said. “It has to accommodate imperfect conditions and imperfect piloting. Control harmony allows you to have that without becoming unstable. It makes it much more enjoyable for the pilot to fly, and much safer.”

Further tuning of the airflow helped achieve what Page thinks will prove to be a smooth, laminar aircraft with low drag and minimal aerodynamic interference from various interfaces on the airplane — such as landing gear, the tail assembly, and the intersection of the wing and the fuselage. The latter is a particularly problematic area, as it tends to cancel out efficiencies achieved elsewhere. To manage it, Page made the wing and body connection extremely blended. Not so much that it could be called a blended-wing-body airplane, but enough to diminish the losses.

All of this was validated through computer simulation, in particular via the X-Plane software developed by Laminar Research — a program that’s renowned for its highly accurate physics simulations. Creator Austin Meyer serves as an advisor to Beta, and contributed to its control system designs. Test pilot Camron “Arlo” Guthrie, who flew General Dynamics F-16s for the Air National Guard, has been leading the integration of this simulation technology to ensure it’s smoothly deployed for training as well as aerodynamic modeling and flight-control development.

“We have a totally new propulsion system and aircraft configuration, and these need unique avionics, displays, control interfaces, and more,” Guthrie said while demonstrating Alia’s flight simulator. “We’re now in our 10th iteration of our flight controls, and we’re constantly testing it all out here to see how it works. It’s a truly immersive, visual environment to work in.”

Guthrie said the advance to aggressive flight test will allow them to hone the algorithms and aircraft responses to pilot inputs — as well as help them make sure pilots can intuitively grasp what the airplane is doing. So far, flying the simulator has suggested that Alia should be an easy bird to fly. “It’s a light touch, just as you’d expect in a very high-performance airplane,” Guthrie said. “But it’s also a very low-workload airplane and has excellent handling qualities. To land you just get down to the stall speed of conventional airplanes, and then lean into it and you’re in horizontal flight.”

Alia’s flight test program will continue with more more tethered hovers and high-speed taxi tests before progressing to horizontal and then vertical flight. Eric Adams Photo

Beta’s first application for Alia will be to accommodate the mission of United Therapeutics, the pharmaceutical company that provided initial funding for Beta. United Therapeutics is developing manmade organs for human transplant, and founder Martine Rothblatt — herself an accomplished aviator who also sponsored the development of an electric version of the Robinson R44 helicopter by Tier One Engineering — wanted a reliable, green system for distributing those organs on-demand. Clark said the urgency of that mission compelled the Beta team to select a configuration that would generate the greatest range and be the most safe and reliable feasible system — that is, with the fewest amount of breakable moving parts, and also the most redundancy.

The motors Beta developed are essentially two motors in one for each rotor, so the likelihood of failure is dramatically reduced, and the minimization of moving parts will help speed certification — a challenge faced by all eVTOL manufacturers. It has also made the development process filled with far fewer unknowns. “We’re not trying to break the laws of physics,” said mechanical engineer Manon Belzile. “You might not be able to find the most lightweight solution right away, but we can certainly find solutions that will make this aircraft fly. Then the more we fly, the more we’ll be able to optimize everything. It’s an engineering challenge, but we know we’re going to get there.”

Fast on the heels of the United Therapeutics adoption, Alia will be adapted for commercial and industrial use, a role as an air taxi, and military applications. Beta is already proving integral to the U.S. Air Force’s Agility Prime effort to spur the development of electric aircraft. Along with Joby Aviation, it’s one of just two companies to recently advance to the next stage of development support from the Air Force in that effort.

Beta hasn’t estimated Alia’s range and other specifications formally yet, though it will say it’s targeting 250 miles (400 kilometers) and charge times under one hour. Its battery technology is still not fully disclosed, though its packs are designed and manufactured in-house from commercially available lithium-ion cells. Propulsion engineer Herman Wiegman, a former energy storage specialist for GE Global Research, said the program is viable with existing battery technology, albeit with careful integration.

“The battery pack is fundamental, and very integral to the success of the aircraft,” he noted. “But you have to be careful about the presence of the mass in the aircraft, how much frontal area is dedicated to the battery packs, how much drag will be induced because of their presence. One doesn’t simply purchase a battery pack off the common market and integrate it into an aircraft.” He added, however, that their mass can be advantageous, helping stabilize the aircraft against wind gusts while in a hover, for instance.

XProtect’s open platform architecture has fostered an ever-expanding community of camera manufacturers, application providers and software developers, all working to create integrations and extensions to XProtect.

Milestone XProtect Video Management Software

Building your video installation on XProtect gives you the opportunity to leverage this community and its thousands of integrated solutions, so you can add additional value and capabilities to your system. XProtect video management software brings all the puzzle pieces of a video surveillance installation together in a perfect combination to create a solution that keeps people and property safe today – and tomorrow.

 

 

Ultra Match-Standalone Iris Recognition System

Utilizes the most accurate biometric recognition technology
Color LED shows the proper verification distance
Mobile management enabled by wireless connection

UltraMatch series products has a stylish design and reliable performance. Adopting BioNANO algorithm, the system provides the most accurate, stable, and quickest iris recognition while delivering high-level security in biometric enrollment, individual identification, and access control.

Iris recognition system can identify and authenticate users accurately and is not affected by outside environmental conditions.

A web based software and a PC version management software allow clients to manage the system easily. Iris SDK is available to developer and integrator for developing identity management applications or easy integration and expansions to existing security system.

Depending on its high accuracy, the terminal is ideal for high-level security applications, such as Border Protection, Pharmaceutical & Healthcare or Jails.

Accurate & Unforgettable

Iris recognition can accurately identify individuals using common biometric technologies. Even twins have completely independent iris textures. Iris patterns are unique and can not be duplicated.

Fast Identification

Anviz Iris recognition products use binocular recognition technology, which effectively solves the instability and randomness of traditional single-eye Iris recognition. It uses a high-speed interactive platform to achieve rapid recognition of less than 0.5 seconds per person.

Independent research and development

Live-tissue Verification’ technique: By comparing the continuous iris images, it analyzes the changes of pupil to get the result.

Multiple authentication modes (left, right, either, or both eyes) for different security levels or particular requirement.

Glass reflex spot detection: Eliminate the spot re-flexed by glass and get clear and clean iris image.

Wide Adoption

Iris recognition is more suitable than other biometric identification in certain environments. If one has a worn or injured fingerprints or wear gloves, the UltraMatch is better than fingerprint devices.

The UltraMatch works in all lighting environments, from bright illumination to total darkness. The system supports all eye colors.

The UltraMatch can identify subjects even when they are wearing eyeglasses, most sunglasses, most types of contact lenses, and even face masks.

Mobile Management Enabled By Wireless Connection

S2000 can be managed by the mobile phone which no need to invest on complex system deployment and software installation in many temporary hospitals and other places.A web based software and a PC version management software allow clients to manage the system easily.

Meanwhile, Iris SDK is available to developer and integrator for developing identity management applications or easy integration and expansions to existing security system.

Configuration

The military smartphone tested and proven by operators
Based on the proven success of the Galaxy S9 Tactical Edition for operators in the field, the Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition is a massive leap forward in tactical mobility. Tested and fielded in special operations, it connects seamlessly with tactical radios and mission systems to increase situational awareness for a common operational picture. The Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition is the only end user device you’ll need for mission planning, training, operations and daily use.

For Operators, Cognitive Dominance is Built on Mobility

To make informed decisions and achieve their objective, tactical teams and special operators require the ability to quickly and securely process and share mission data across complex terrain, expansive distances between troops and with Command. To address these unique issues, Samsung created the Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition—a mission-ready solution tailored to the specific needs of tactical teams.
For Operators, Cognitive Dominance is Built on Mobility

Persistent communications in any domain

The Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition features pre-configured software to support tactical radios and mission-critical devices.
tactical radio support
Common operational picture
Drivers support tactical radios, drone feeds, laser range finders, external GPS and more for a complete view of the mission.

Flexible to fit your tactical kit

Ruggedized case solutions, connectors and hubs accommodate a wide range of tactical kit configurations for multi-mission capabilities.

Next-gen network capable
The Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition supports multiple carrier networks and the use of private SIMs 5G, WiFi 6 and CBRS.
One device to meet all your mission requirements

Cognitive dominance

Capable of running mission applications in the field and enterprise applications everywhere else, the powerful and efficient 64-bit Octa-core processor delivers tactical computing power wherever the mission takes you.
tactical edge computing with 10 nm 64-bit Octa-core processor
Enhance situational awareness for a complete and accurate common operational picture

The Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition has exclusive features, tested and proven by operators, for rapid information capture, sharing and analysis in diverse operating environments.

tactical applications

Exclusive tactical features

Night Vision Mode, Stealth Mode, Lock Screen Auto Rotate and more deliver fast access to the information operators need.

Capture intelligence in low light

Use the pro-grade 64 MP camera to take and share high-resolution images or 8K video, without giving away your position.

Get a clear view of the mission

View and analyze maps, intel and mission data in greater detail than ever before with the Dynamic AMOLED 2.0, a 120Hz display.

Galaxy S20 Tactical Edition and ATAK

TACTICAL APP QUICK LAUNCH

ATAK at the push of a button

Remapped side key button provides one-touch launch/hide of mission applications including ATAK, APASS and BATDOK.

Auto-touch sensitivity for gloved hands

AUTO-TOUCH SENSITIVITY

Leave the gloves on

Auto-touch sensitivity automatically adjusts S20 TE operation for gloved hands.

Volume control

Hear it clear and find it fast with a Tile that’s twice as loud as before.

Improved Proximity Meter

Know when you’re getting closer to your lost item and make finding easier.

New ringtones

Choose from a variety of new

Tile Pro Tracker With Replaceable Battery

These small and nifty gadgets by Tile will help you find anything you attach them to, so long as your phone is within their Bluetooth range of 400 feet. In case you lose an item, you’ll receive notifications when the gadgets come within range of another Tile user.

Available in black and white, the Tile Pro trackers are as easy to set up as it gets — all you need is a mobile app and a Tile account. The replaceable CR1632 battery of the trackers will last for a year after you activate the tracker.

Tesla has unveiled in Los Angeles its new electric model, the Cybertruck, a pick-up with an extravagant design with up to 805 kilometers of autonomy capable of accelerating from 0 to 96 km / h in 2.9 seconds. Its production will begin in 2021 and will hit the market with a starting price of $ 40,000 (36,000 euros).

The Tesla Cybertruck, one of the safest pick-up or caravan vehicles in the world


Cybertruck is manufactured with an exterior chassis made to provide the greatest durability and protection for passengers. Starting with an almost impenetrable exoskeleton, all components are engineered to provide superior strength and solidity, from the ultra-rugged 30x cold-rolled stainless steel frame cladding to Tesla’s armored glass.

EXO SKELETON

If there was something better, we would use it. Help prevent dents, damage and long-term corrosion with a smooth monochrome exoskeleton that places the chassis on the outside of the car and provides you and your passengers with maximum protection.30X ULTRA-RESISTANT COLD ROLLED STAINLESS STEEL

Regarding the other great claim in terms of foreign security by the new Tesla model, the  armored glasses  that Cybertruck mounts , called by the brand as Tesla Armor Glass, Elon Musk has once again used his Twitter account to demonstrate the Their resistance was once evident after one of them broke when tested in full presentation.

TESLA ARMORED GLASS

Ultra-tough glass and polymer-layered composite can absorb and redirect impact force to improve performance and damage tolerance. Regarding the other great claim in terms of foreign security by the new Tesla model, the  armored glasses  that Cybertruck mounts , called by the brand as Tesla Armor Glass, Elon Musk has once again used his Twitter account to demonstrate the Their resistance was once evident after one of them broke when tested in full presentation.

Initial shipments of new FLIR A400/A700 thermal sensor solution to be prioritised for entities working to mitigate the spread of COVID-19     

FLIR Systems has launched the FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor and Thermal Image Streaming fixed camera solutions for monitoring equipment, production lines, critical infrastructure and screening for elevated skin temperatures.

These highly configurable smart camera systems provide accurate, non-contact temperature monitoring across a wide range of disciplines: manufacturing process control, product development, emissions monitoring, waste management, facilities maintenance, and Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) improvements.

FLIR launches Thermal Smart Sensor solution for temperature screening

The FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor solution initially will be prioritised for those responding to COVID-19. For all applications, the series offers multi-image streaming, edge computing, and Wi-Fi connectivity to help speed data flow and enable faster decisions, improving productivity and safety for professionals.

FLIR designed the A400/A700 cameras with two configurations to better meet application-specific needs. The Thermal Smart Sensor configuration, recommended for measuring elevated skin temperatures, incorporates advanced measurement tools and alarms with edge computing to enable faster critical decisions.

The Image Streaming configuration provides multiple thermal streaming capabilities to help optimise process control, improve quality assurance, or identify potential failures that could shut down a production line.

Users design their systems by choosing either the Smart Sensor or Imaging Streaming configurations, selecting either the A400 or A700 camera body based on the resolutions they need, and then adding lenses and a range of optional features to fit their application.

“For more than 40 years, FLIR thermal imaging has provided technologies for professionals to improve not only their capabilities, but also their safety on the job,” says Jim Cannon, President and CEO at FLIR.

“As the world works together to face the global COVID-19 pandemic, given the need for this technology, FLIR will prioritise initial deliveries of this new A-series camera to professionals using it in elevated skin temperature screening as an adjunct to other elevated body temperature screening tools to help to fight the spread of the virus.”

Also, FLIR currently is in beta testing for an automated elevated skin temperature screening software solution that is fully integrated with its United States Food and Drug Administration-certified thermal cameras. The solution is designed to rapidly increase the accuracy, ease-of-use, and speed of existing screening procedures. FLIR will share an announcement about its solution in Q2 2020.

Initial Shipments of New FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Sensor Solution to be Prioritized for Entities Working to Mitigate the Spread of COVID-19 Virus

ARLINGTON, Va. March 31, 2020 – FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: FLIR) today announced the FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor and Thermal Image Streaming fixed camera solutions for monitoring equipment, production lines, critical infrastructure, and screening for elevated skin temperatures. These highly configurable smart camera systems provide accurate, non-contact temperature monitoring across a wide range of disciplines: manufacturing process control, product development, emissions monitoring, waste management, facilities maintenance, and Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) improvements. The FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor solution initially will be prioritized for those responding to COVID-19. For all applications, the series offers multi-image streaming, edge computing, and Wi-Fi connectivity to help speed data flow and enable faster decisions, improving productivity and safety for professionals.

FLIR designed the A400/A700 cameras with two configurations to better meet application-specific needs. The Thermal Smart Sensor configuration, recommended for measuring elevated skin temperatures, incorporates advanced measurement tools and alarms with edge computing to enable faster critical decisions. The Image Streaming configuration provides multiple thermal streaming capabilities to help optimize process control, improve quality assurance, or identify potential failures that could shut down a production line.

Users design their systems by choosing either the Smart Sensor or Imaging Streaming configurations, selecting either the A400 or A700 camera body based on the resolutions they need, and then adding lenses and a range of optional features to fit their application.

“For more than 40 years, FLIR thermal imaging has provided technologies for professionals to improve not only their capabilities, but also their safety on the job,” says Jim Cannon, President and CEO at FLIR. “As the world works together to face the global COVID-19 pandemic, given the need for this technology, FLIR will prioritize initial deliveries of this new A-series camera to professionals using it in elevated skin temperature screening as an adjunct to other elevated body temperature screening tools to help to fight the spread of the virus.”

Also, FLIR currently is in beta testing for an automated elevated skin temperature screening software solution that is fully integrated with its United States Food and Drug Administration-certified thermal cameras. The solution is designed to rapidly increase the accuracy, ease-of-use, and speed of existing screening procedures. FLIR will share an announcement about its solution in Q2 2020.

FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor and Thermal Image Streaming cameras are available for purchase today globally from FLIR distributor partners. To learn more, please visit www.flir.com/A400-A700-Series.

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About FLIR Systems, Inc.
Founded in 1978, FLIR Systems is a world-leading industrial technology company focused on intelligent sensing solutions for defense, industrial, and commercial applications. FLIR Systems’ vision is to be “The World’s Sixth Sense,” creating technologies to help professionals make more informed decisions that save lives and livelihoods. For more information, please visit www.flir.com and follow @flir.

FLIR A400/A700 Thermal Smart Sensor and Thermal Image Streaming cameras are available for purchase today globally from FLIR distributor partners. To learn more, please visit www.flir.co.uk/A400-A700-Series.

Is this microreactor the future of nuclear architecture?

The 50-foot-tall Aurora plant, designed by Oklo, unites old and new aspects of nuclear power.

Gensler’s design for Oklo’s Aurora micro-reactor and power plant. All images courtesy of Oklo.

Although nuclear power and weapons have influenced design since the  Atomic Age  , a new power plant designed by  Oklo  , developer of a 1.5MW compact passive fast reactor, is poised to start a new wave of nuclear architecture. The 50-foot-tall Aurora Microreactor Plant unites old and new aspects of nuclear power in several ways; Oklo made headlines recentlyAnnounced that Aurora, which is expected to begin operating in 2024, will be powered by low-enriched uranium from the Idaho National Laboratory. The use of HALEU (high enrichment and low enrichment uranium) is unique in that it takes advantage of already used nuclear fuel that has been discarded by large processing facilities, which often only use around 50% of the power potential of their core material Previously replacing it, Oklo, which launched in 2013 and debuted with the Aurora plant project in fall 2019, aims to recover 90-100% of the energy available within the fuel, using fast fission and fast reactors.

“We are using the same physical reactions, we are using fission, but almost everything we are trying to do is completely different from the industry, historically,” Caroline Cochran said    in a telephone interview with Hyperallergic. The microreactor and Oklo plant do not require water or a lot of land, and the small-scale footprint improves the ability to meet the energy needs of communities in remote locations, such as small Alaskan cities, but perhaps not just their needs. of energy. The Aurora plant also represents an evolution in the aesthetics of nuclear design, with Oklo’s conscious effort to make its power station accessible and attractive to the surrounding community.

The A-shaped plant shape is strong, weather resistant, and makes good use of sun angles for a variety of panels.

“We have been thinking a lot about how to meet their needs further, mainly to provide electricity, but how can we also be a meeting point?” Cochran said. “A town hall, a garden, an indoor pool, during the moments in Alaska when people don’t exercise much or don’t have access to fresh vegetables? That kind of things. How can the building itself be iconic and recognizable, but also take on the flavor of the available areas?

The company employed  Gensler  to focus on their vision of the structure, and decided on an A-frame structure that brings together various cultural references, practical considerations, and space efficiencies for Aurora. The team was inspired by structures including the  Cadet Chapel of  the  United States Air Force Academy  , and comments on the design have compared the smooth, domed triangular construction to a Star Wars building, a cathedral, a Swiss chalet. … and even some less elevated notions.

“One person thought they were being rude to us when comparing it to an IHOP,” said Cochran, “but I think it’s kind of interesting, the different opinions of what it reminds them of, and I’d say it’s a good thing.” . We were trying to think about the community aspects that we hope to develop together with them, and these will vary by site. ”

The mid-century feel of design is a fitting nod to the roots of the nuclear aesthetic of the atomic age.

In addition to mid-century aesthetics referencing the original era of nuclear design, A-racks are the strongest lattice construction, and therefore ideal for housing and protecting the working aspects of the power plant, including the supporting cranes that move the jobs inside the plant, but the angle of the sides also lines up well with the solar array that will be attached to the energy processing. In high snow and low light latitudes like Alaska, the angle of the A-frame roof throws snow and maximizes exposure to sunlight. But Oklo also has more fancy ideas for the panels, hoping to employ  Sistine Solar  in implementing custom solar panel designs, including one commissioned by the artist. Forest Stearns  for Aurora design, which creates a reflection of the Alaskan sky touched by Aurora Borealis.

Coming soon … Aurora lights the way for new approaches to nuclear power and design.

Everything about Oklo, including the company name, which refers to the Oklo region of the Gabon state in Central Africa, where  nuclear fission is a natural feature  of the prehistoric landscape, indicates that it is a company that thinks very holistically. on the role of nuclear energy. it plays in human society, in nature and in the universe. These nuclear innovators look to a future where people stop for a cup of coffee at their local power plant (radiation dose not included) before using that energy potential for deep space exploration. That’s a lot of weight on the shoulders of an A-frame structure, but for now, Oklo projects a healthy glow of confidence and potential in the quick-fission design and deployment.

autor :

Small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) technology continues to provide global organizations with new solutions for inventory, delivery, and surveillance. And as those capabilities expand into new business and consumer applications, so must security providers ensure that the increase in sUAS traffic is monitored, and any uncooperative or threatening sUAS are identified and addressed before they cause disruption, damage, or harm to people.

Introducing DroneTracker 4.1, Providing Advanced Radar & PTZ Camera Integration for sUAS Detection & Threat Mitigation

Dedrone today is introducing DroneTracker 4.1, building upon the success of our foundational software platform to provide critical advances for security providers to detect and act upon drone threats. DroneTracker 4.1 delivers Dedrone customers upgraded core components that address the growing and evolving threat of unwanted or uncooperative sUAS in our airspace.

 

DroneTracker 4.1 offers eight critical updates to core platform components and new features, including:

1. ADVANCED RADAR INTEGRATION

Dedrone provides an open-systems architecture, which allows our customers to select the sensor technologies which best fit their individual needs and problem set. The core of any drone detection system starts with RF sensors, which detect drones on the basis of their radio signals.


However, drones may fly autonomously and follow a pre-programmed route, making them nearly invisible to RF sensors. Organizations such as airports and militaries have to protect larger areas, and radar systems, with their long-range detection capabilities, may be helpful. DroneTracker 4.1 provides interfaces for radar systems from selected technology partners.

2. AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION BY PTZ CAMERAS

For organizations that require visual verification of a drone, cameras may need to be added to a counter-drone technology platform. DroneTracker 4.1 features an intelligent sensor fusion technology which enables PTZ cameras to automatically verify radar detection data. DroneTracker 4.1 automatically fuses the data from different sensors, including radar, PTZ cameras, and RF, to provide a clear understanding of airspace activity.

3. NEW CLASSIFICATION OPTIONS FOR ORGANIZATIONS WITH ACTIVE SUAS PROGRAMS

As more organizations bring sUAS to work, DroneTracker 4.1 now enables security providers to focus on only those alerts that need intervention – an important step towards managing commercial drones activity. New classifications include “friend” for sUAS that are recognized or a part of an organization’s sUAS program, “foe” for any unwanted or uncooperative sUAS, and “ignore” to shut off any alerts that may not need further investigation.

4. THERMAL, INFRARED SUAS DETECTION VIA HIGH-PERFORMANCE PTZ CAMERAS

Supporting the latest advancements in radar and PTZ technology, DroneTracker 4.1 now provides accurate visual verification of sUAS in low-light environments through thermal and infrared detection. Depending on the model, PTZ cameras can visually record and track drones at distances of several kilometers, even in adverse weather conditions, so that security teams retain a maximum overview of drone activities in their airspace at all times.

5. STABILIZED DRONE TRACKING IN LIVE FEED & RECORDINGS

When PTZ cameras are integrated into DroneTracker, customers are able to view a feed of the flight. DroneTracker 4.1 features new updates to our AI-based video analysis feature, which includes an advanced and proprietary sUAS recognition algorithm.

6. PTZ CONTROL VIA SEPARATE DASHBOARD

DroneTracker 4.1 has an extra cropped view for a better overview and control of visual detection with PTZ cameras. A PTZ operator can use DroneTracker 4.1’s PTZ dashboard to connect to different cameras across a single installation, operate them intuitively and orientate themselves using a new, interactive map. In addition, users can save and mark selected images or video recordings with detected drones for post-event analysis.

7. CONTINUOUS UPGRADES TO PROPRIETARY SUAS SIGNATURE DATABASE, DRONEDNA

Detection accuracy of sensors relies on known drone signatures in DroneTracker’s proprietary database, DroneDNA. DroneDNA provides specific information on the exact type of drone, helping immensely to reduce the false-positive and false-negative detection rate. DroneTracker 4.1 comes with the most DroneDNA updates of any software upgrade, and now provides users with automated monthly updates of DroneDNA.

8. UPGRADED USER EXPERIENCE FOR COORDINATED INCIDENT RESPONSE

The re-designed and enhanced home screen improves user experience to ensure a rapid threat assessment and coordinated incident response. DroneTracker 4.1’s improved drone path accuracy during the alert enables security teams to deploy appropriate, timely, and effective countermeasures.

Since Dedrone’s establishment in 2014, security organizations around the world have seen laws about drone activity change, new technologies being introduced, and significant threats to their airspace emerge, including drone attacks at oil pipelines, correctional facilities, and continued interruptions at airports, public events, and over military installations. DroneTracker continues to provide reliable detection data, and intuitive analytics tools such as heatmaps and automated reporting, for security professionals to understand drone activity and protect critical assets.

For more information on how you can access DroneTracker 4.1, and the Dedrone counter-drone technology platform, contact us here.