Virtual Reality Delivers Immersive, Remote Collaboration for Automotive Design Teams

With HTC VIVE, NVIDIA, and Autodesk in their corner, automotive OEMs are evolving the design process, and shortening the time it takes to go from concept to model.

Collaboration | Design/Visualization

Creating an automobile from scratch is no easy feat. From concepting the look of a new model, to sculpting it from clay, to designing intricate pieces that give the car its personality, and collaborating with teams around the globe; it’s a complex process to say the least. Now, do it in an even shorter timeframe than the other guy, and create a whole lineup with nuanced features to suit an increasingly critical consumer segment.

To better suit the growing demand for global team collaboration and the ability to efficiently develop products, auto manufacturers have turned to virtual reality. Teams from around the world can join with their colleagues in the Autodesk VRED environment to work together on the virtual production of their vehicle models. The combination of Autodesk VRED software, powered by NVIDIA Quadro RTX, and experienced through the VIVE Pro Eye delivers an immersive design experience for many of these top automotive companies.


Hyundai Motors and the Migration to VR-Assisted Design

Hyundai Motors understands the need for a more integrated approach to model development. The many rounds of design feedback with numerous teams that has always been a staple in the automotive development process is now giving way to VR-assisted car design, and Hyundai was quick to adopt it to positively disrupt their process.

In March of this year, Hyundai created the world’s largest VR design evaluation facility, where 20 designers, engineers, or key stakeholders can simultaneously log into a virtual environment to evaluate a car design. The Autodesk VRED powered by NVIDIA Quadro RTX system, in conjunction with VIVE Pro Eye’s foveated rendering provide a cutting-edge experience, allowing for the most minute detail to be reviewed, discussed, approved, or revised.

No stone is left unturned within the VR experience, by just moving the controller teams can modify the virtual car’s color, texture, and parts. From there, teams can also view a high fidelity rendering of the car’s interior, envisioning what the car buyer may actually experience once the car model rolls of the line and into the dealership. To add an additional element of realism, cars can be placed in real world backgrounds, truly illustrating every facet of car design.

Hyundai has embraced VR-assisted car development and are looking to migrate their current process to fully virtual designing in the future.

Hyundai Designers involved in the VR-assisted evaluation process. From left, Senior Researchers Choi KyungWon, Park YoungSoo, and Bae ByoungSang, and Researcher Kang SungMook

BUGATTI’s Virtual Design Process Marries Tradition with Time and Cost Savings

BUGATTI is no stranger to the quality and craftsmanship that goes into creating automotive works of art. The core tradition they uphold with any car design is that it starts with the creative vision of the individual, in which the vision comes alive on the screen. Once a consensus has been reached, the digital model is transferred to a physical model made from rigid foam. With the inclusion of digital design in the creative process, it has helped the product development team cut a quarter of the costs and half of the design time. Thanks to VR and 3D technology, the BUGATTI Divo was designed in six months instead of the year it usually takes.

BUGATTI is visualizing design through VR. On the left it is Head of CAD and Visualization, Ahmet Daggün and on the right is Chief Designer Achim Anscheidt.


Ford Holds Realtime Design Reviews in the Virtual Space

The pandemic wasn’t going to stop Ford from doing what they love to do, designing cars. So, the company issued VR kits to Engineers and Directors across the globe in order for teams to maintain the momentum of designing the next Ford vehicle. But it didn’t stop there.

To ensure everyone had a chance to review designs, Ford created a live virtual design review in a digital airplane hangar, created in both 2D for viewers to experience without VR equipment, as well as the complete 3D models for those in VR. The models being showcased were #TeamFordzilla, Ford’s e-sports team, each car being designed by #TeamFordzilla’s designers.

Utilizing Autodesk VRED with NVIDIA Quadro RTX workstations, the teams were able to create realistic, high fidelity virtual models that could be shown off without a VR headset. But, when paired with the VIVE Pro and VIVE Pro Eye, the experience took the event to another level, as engineers and attendees could really see how different light sources create different reflective patterns on the models.

The live design review session, featuring Moray Callum (VP, Ford Design), Amko Leenarts (Design Director, Ford of Europe), Joel Piaskowski (Ford Global Design Director, Cars and Crossovers), and Kemal Curic (Design Director, Lincoln Motor Company), allowed everyone to experience how the Ford team goes through a design review and to learn what aspects of design are important to them.

The automobile industry is but one of many industries whose complex development process has been made easier, more efficient, and more collaborative thanks to the work of VIVE, Autodesk, and NVIDIA. Ultimately, through the evolution of digital research and design, which leverages virtual reality, advanced design software, and powerful graphics processing; automobile manufacturers will continue to be at the forefront of innovation and better serve the needs of the car buying public.

CORAIL, Roche Bobois design Antoine Fritsch & Vivien Durisotti

Texte technique

Table repas ronde ou rectangulaire avec piètement réalisé par impression 3D de béton (BUHP), personnalisable en forme et texture. Platine en acier (laque époxy, 2 coloris), plateau en verre trempé ép. 15mm.

Existe en 5 formes et dimensions.

Texte poétique

Avec CORAIL, Roche Bobois réalise une première mondiale dans l’ameublement, une innovation qui va sans doute changer le rapport des consommateurs à la création, mais aussi celui de l’industrie à sa distribution: sa base est réalisée en béton à partir d’une imprimante 3D, et personnalisable.

Autre innovation majeure, le logiciel que le client –chez lui ou avec un conseiller en boutique– peut utiliser pour influer sur l’objet : choisir sa forme, sa taille, mais aussi choisir d’appliquer l’effet de tressage où il veut, et visionner en direct l’objet qu’il façonne. Le code génétique ainsi défini nourrira l’imprimante 3D. En cinq formats ronds et rectangles, il définira les effets de torsion et de tressage qui feront d’elle sa pièce unique.

Après l’insertion de ce code génétique de la base contenant ses caractéristiques, l’imprimante géante, merveille de technologie, se met en marche. En un mouvement continu du bas jusqu’en haut, la buse pilotée numériquement dépose un serpent de BUHP (béton ultra-haute performance) qui durcit au fur et à mesure des superpositions.

Avec sa forme évoquant les champignons polyphores incrustés aux arbres, des coraux sur leur récif ou d’énormes coquillages baroques, Corail est avant tout un superbe objet inspiré par la beauté de l’imperfection naturelle et qui laisse libre cours à l’imagination de celui qui l’adopte.

Biographie designer

Deux doigts d’une même main, Antoine Fritsch et Vivien Durisotti sont en recherche permanente d’équilibre entre l’homme et son environnement. Chaque projet est abordé avec une vision globale, pour une réponse juste en terme d’usage et signifiante vis-à-vis de l’individu. Leurs projets passent le plus souvent par une rencontre, un échange. Ces collaborations, faites d’humanité, donnent poésie et profondeur à leurs créations. Ardents militants du « positive design », Antoine et Vivien ont à cœur d’anticiper les mutations de société en cours, d’un éclairage prospectif et généreux. Leur vision invite à un mieux vivre ensemble communicatif. De l’appétit de comprendre, d’innover et surprendre, jusqu’au plaisir de faire et satisfaire.

CORAIL

design Antoine Fritsch & Vivien Durisotti

Technical text

Round dining table with 3D-printed concrete (UHPC) with customizable shape and texture. Steel base (epoxy lacquer, 2 colours), top in 15mm- thick tempered glass.

L.280 x H.73 x D.120 cm

Available in 5 shapes and dimensions.

Poetic text

With CORAIL, Roche Bobois has achieved a world first in furniture – an innovation that is set to change the relationship both between consumers and design, and between the industry and its distribution. The table’s base is made from 3D-printed concrete and fully customisable. Once the “genetic code” containing the base’s characteristics is inserted, the giant printer – a marvel of technology – is activated. In a continuous upwards movement, the digitally operated nozzle dispenses a ribbon of UHPC (ultra-high performance concrete) that hardens in the course of layering.

Another major innovation is the software that customers can use at home or with an in-store advisor to help craft the object: choose its shape and size, decide whether to apply a weaving effect and where, and view their design in real time. The resulting “code” will feed the 3D printer. In addition to being customisable, this new process has potential ecological virtues: it will be easier to send a digital file to the United States or China and to have the base manufactured there by a local printer equipped with the technology. This would generate carbon savings by cutting out transport.

Its shape summons polypore fungi incrusted in trees, coral colonies on a reef, or giant baroque shells. Corail is a superb object inspired by the beauty of natural imperfection, giving free rein to the imagination of its owner. The base comes in five round and rectangular shapes, and customers can choose the twisting and weaving effects that will make their piece unique. The dotted texture of the ultra-high performance concrete lets them explore a wide range of options before reaching their decision.

 

Designer biography

Antoine Fritsch and Vivien Durisotti are constantly searching for harmony between people and our environment. Each project is approached with a global vision that considers the user’s needs. The sincerity of their collaborations adds poetic charm and depth to their creations. Ardent advocates of positive design, their ethos is based on encouraging more interaction between people. Fritsh and Durisotti have the ability to innovate, surprise and delight those who encounter their designs.

Integrated Systems Europe

MIKE BLACKMAN: ISE REMAINS SCHEDULED FOR 1-4 JUNE

ISE MD Mike Blackman responds to the announcement by AVIXA that the InfoComm 2021 show is set to take place in Orlando in October 2021.

Dear ISE community,

Following today’s announcement that the InfoComm 2021 show will now take place in Orlando in October 2021, we want to confirm that Integrated Systems Europe, remains scheduled to open live and online on 1-4 June 2021 in its new home at the Fira Barcelona.

Whilst we recognise there continue to be challenges ahead, we are in touch with government and the relevant health authorities to constantly monitor the situation. None of us can predict how the situation will look in June, but we are hopeful that by the second quarter of 2021 we will see the world return to a new ‘normal’ with vaccines being rapidly delivered in many countries around the world.

We understand our exhibitors and partners need to make commitments that will incur cost and we do not wish to burden them unnecessarily. For this reason, if circumstances impact our ability to host an in-person event and we are forced to cancel this element of ISE, we will make this decision by 1 March.

With the backdrop of the global pandemic, our priority in recent months has been devising the means to deliver a safe and secure event for all exhibitors and visitors and we have been working closely with the City of Barcelona, the venue and relevant authorities.

In early January, Fira de Barcelona received the ‘Safe Travels’ stamp, an internationally recognised endorsement from the World Travel Tourism Council (WTTC), developed in collaboration with the specialist risk management consultancy Aon and the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona.

ISE has also published A Guide to Safe Visiting, outlining the safe practice protocols that have been put in place with the Fira Gran Vía to ensure that the visitor experience is safe and secure. The guide can be located here.

Looking ahead to June, we can confirm that today, over 37,000 sqm of space is signed up with just under 700 exhibitors confirmed and new companies continuing to book their place on the floorplan.

Next week sees online visitor registration open, coming at a time when we realise the industry is keen to ‘get back to work’ in the second half of the year. Feedback from our recent customer research shows that the industry is looking forward to meeting as soon as the situation allows and we are currently updating the research to measure current sentiment amongst both our exhibitors and visitors.

In a time where many of our industry colleagues are suffering financially or have lost their jobs or businesses, we at ISE are striving to do everything we can to contribute to the industry getting back on its feet.

I would personally like to thank all our customers, partners and colleagues within the industry which we serve and look forward to seeing you again soon.

Thank you,

Mike Blackman
Managing Director
Integrated Systems Europe

The Ultimaker S5 is our Spring 2020 pick for the “Best Dual Extruder 3D Printer”. Check out our Ultimaker S5 review to find out why it is an excellent multi-material machine for small businesses.

Ultimaker S5 Review: Best Dual Extruder 3D Printer 2020

Founded in 2011, the Dutch 3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker has solidified itself as a pioneer in the open source 3D printing community. With a highly praised range of professional-grade 3D printers and one of the most popular 3D printing slicers in Cura, there’s no doubt that Ultimaker is one of the most influential players in the desktop 3D printing market.

In 2016, the company released the Ultimaker 3, a groundbreaking dual extrusion 3D printer that many still consider as the best professional machine that money can buy. Back in April, during the manufacturing technology trade show Hannover Messe 2018, Ultimaker unveiled the new Ultimaker S5 3D printer, a bigger and better model that would replace the beloved Ultimaker 3.

The company has recently started shipping its new machine to its first customers, so you can understand our excitement when a large Ultimaker-branded package arrived at the All3DP office. After cracking open the cardboard box, we were greeted with a sizable and sleek Ultimaker S5 3D printer. Here’s what we thought about it.

supporting

Sant’Agata Bolognese, 15 April 2020 – Automobili Lamborghini is providing resources and equipment from its Research and Development Department for the co-engineering and production of breathing simulators, supporting Siare Engineering International Group, Italy’s top manufacturer of ventilators, during the health emergency caused by the spread of COVID-19.

supporting

supporting

The breathing simulator enables the tester to carry out an initial evaluation of the ventilator’s performance before reaching the final checking stage, when the ventilator undergoes a comprehensive test using certified equipment.

In just two weeks, Lamborghini has used its 3D printing laboratory to design, produce and validate the simulator, optimizing the components and enabling the production of 18 simulators per week, alongside the 3D-printed production of medical visors in polycarbonate, using an HP Jet Fusion 3D 4200 printer with MJF technology capable of printing with a 0.08 mm precision level.

The capacity to collaborate shown by these two Emilia-based manufacturers of technologically advanced products – both leading companies in their respective, though completely different, sectors – is further proof of the sense of responsibility and cohesion displayed by Italy’s companies, as they join forces in the battle against the pandemic.

A recent study by MIT demonstrated how to increase satiety with smaller portions.

The CSAIL HCI engineering group conducted a study, during which they learned that the shape or form of food is directly related to the feeling of satisfaction that a person experiences during food. For example, if you increase the volume of space occupied by the portion on the plate, then a feeling of fullness will be faster. The texture of our food is also important: the more chewing is required, the higher the level of satiety.

Create food perception illusions using 3D food printing

A 3D printer with a specialized nozzle was used to print an edible dough in paste form. Dishes were created that were identical in nutritional value, but different in shape and texture.

Then, printed food was offered to thirty participants in the experiment, whose reactions were recorded with the help of electromyography sensors. Based on these findings, scientists have developed the FoodFab system , a 3D food printer that can automatically create various food products. It may be widely adopted in medicine in the future.

Source: hitecher.com